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Computer Architecture Group

PARADISE

PostMoore Architecture and Accelerator Design Space Exploration Using Device Level Simulation and Experiments

An increasing number of technologies are being proposed to preserve digital computing performance scaling as the benefits of lithographic scaling begin to wane. PARADISE is an open-source comprehensive methodology to evaluate emerging technologies with a vertical simulation flow from the individual device level all the way up to the architectural level. PARADISE can be extended to incorporate new technologies for which a compact model exists.

In addition, PARADISE is modular with well-defined interfaces between the components so that users can replace any tool in the flow with an equivalent -- such as commercial synthesis tools. PARADISE will enable the research community to rapidly evaluate the impact of emerging technologies at the architectural level and thus provide the means to select among available technologies and formulate a strategy towards continued digital computing performance scaling.

PARADISE Flow

Project Participants


About Berkeley Lab

Founded in 1931 on the belief that the biggest scientific challenges are best addressed by teams, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and its scientists have been recognized with 14 Nobel Prizes. Today, Berkeley Lab researchers develop sustainable energy and environmental solutions, create useful new materials, advance the frontiers of computing, and probe the mysteries of life, matter, and the universe. Scientists from around the world rely on the Lab’s facilities for their own discovery science. Berkeley Lab is a multiprogram national laboratory, managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit energy.gov/science.