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JGI Releases Latest Version of IMG

July 15, 2005

An enhanced version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) data management system has been released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG 1.1 contains 32 new public genomes and 14 new genomes sequenced by DOE JGI, bringing the total of genomes in IMG to 337. These include 301 bacterial, 25 archaeal, and 11 eukaryotic genomes, of which 36 finished and 75 draft genomes were sequenced by DOE JGI. The new IMG 1.1 features enhanced capabilities to improve the… Read More »

NetLogger Helps Supernova Factory Improve Data Analysis

May 12, 2005

The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) project, established at Berkeley Lab in 2002, aims to dramatically increase the discovery of nearby Type 1a supernovae by applying assembly-line efficiencies to the collection, analysis and retrieval of large amounts of astronomical data. To date, the program has resulted in the discovery of about 150 Type 1a supernovae – about three times the entire number reported before the project was started. Type Ia supernovae are important celestial bodies… Read More »

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Biological Data Management and Technology Center Marks First Year

March 22, 2005

The Biological Data Management and Technology Center (BDMTC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory marked its first anniversary with the release of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, a complex biological data management system BDMTC developed in collaboration with the Microbial Genome Analysis Program (MGAP) at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). As a community resource, IMG integrates JGI’s microbial genome data with publicly available microbial genome data, providing a powerful… Read More »

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LBNL Team Takes Software to the End of the Earth

March 2, 2005

Developing robust, reliable data acquisition software for high-energy physics experiments is always a challenge, but developing such software for an experiment expected to run for up to 15 years while buried in the Antarctic ice poses unique problems. But a team led by Chuck McParland of CRD’s Distributed Scientific Tools Group has risen to the occasion. The first kilometer-long string of 60 detectors recently buried near the South Pole is already recording light pulses as the experiment… Read More »

LBNL Speaker Series in Washington to Feature CRD Expertise

February 1, 2005

Beginning in February, scientists from CRD will launch a series of presentations at Berkeley Lab’s project office in Washington, D.C. The goal of the series is to better inform the Washington research community about the achievements and expertise of LNBL staff. The LBNL office is located at 901 D Street, SW, Suite 950. The office is in the Aerospace Center, across D Street from L’Enfant Plaza. Wes Bethel, leader of the Visualization Group in CRD, will give the first talk at 9 a.m. Read More »

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Face-to-Face Discussion Helps Fusion Scientists Solve Interface Problem

January 24, 2005

Sometimes, $14 can go a long way. For the price of a train ticket from Manhattan to Princeton, CRD’s Sherry Li was able to meet with scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab and together they were able to solve problems that were keeping a new fusion code from running fully parallel. Li, a member of the Scientific Computing Group and one of the key developers of the SuperLU library of solvers, had been consulting with Steve Jardin’s group at PPPL for several months as the fusion… Read More »

LBNL’s DataMover Reaches Milestone with Automated Transfer of 18K Files

November 30, 2004

Amidst the hype and hoopla at the recent SC2004 conference in Pittsburgh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Scientific Data Management Research Group demonstrated the robustness of the group’s DataMover by putting the application through its workaday paces. In doing so, the group reached a milestone when, with a single request, 17,870 data files were moved seamlessly from Brookhaven National Lab in New York to LBNL, both of which are operated by the U.S. Department of Energy. What… Read More »

Crystallization in Silico

November 30, 2004

When Francis Crick and James Watson deciphered the structure of DNA in 1953, X-ray crystallography became famous; key to their success was crystallography of DNA done by Rosalind Franklin in the laboratory of Maurice Wilkins. X-ray crystallography has long since become the workhorse for structural studies of big biological molecules, including most of the many thousands of proteins whose structures have been solved in the last half century. Crystallizing biological molecules is tricky, however. Read More »

The spirit of Lawrence’s Lab lives at CERN

July 8, 2004

GENEVA, Switzerland ‑ Six thousand miles east of Berkeley, in the rolling countryside of the Swiss-French border, the spirit of Ernest Lawrence is alive and well. Berkeley Lab’s founder is noted for many contributions to scientific knowledge, but two of his best-known ideas are the invention of the cyclotron and the idea of bringing together groups of people with a diversity of knowledge and expertise to take on the biggest scientific challenges. At CERN, the European Center for Nuclear… Read More »

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Anatomy of a Web(bed) Legend

June 8, 2004

In the wild, a frog may live to 10 years, assuming it survives tadpolehood and doesn’t get eaten by a bird or a fish or some other creature. On the Web, though, a virtual frog named “Fluffy” has easily notched its tenth year despite millions of dissections. Launched in June1994, by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Virtual Frog Dissection Kit Web site allows users to virtually dissect a frog without all that smelly formaldehyde of high school… Read More »