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Applied Mathematics

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The Applied Mathematics Department is comprised of four groups:  the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group, the Center for Computational Sciences & Engineering, the Mathematics Group and the Scalable Solvers Group. The department develops advanced mathematical models and efficient computational algorithms for solving scientific and engineering problems of interest to the Department of Energy, including in particular those related to energy and environment.  Sample scientific and engineering areas include accelerator physics, astrophysics, climate, combustion, cosmology, seismic imaging and subsurface flow.  Many of the algorithms have scalable implementations that are targeted at current and next-generation massively parallel computer architectures, such as those available at NERSC. Some of the implementations are also available in the form of the user-callable software frameworks and libraries.

Department Head: Esmond Ng

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Applied Numerical Algorithms Group

The Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) develops advanced numerical algorithms and software for partial differential equations integrated with the application of the software to problems of independent scientific and engineering interest. Read More »

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Center for Computational Sciences & Engineering

The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environment, and industrial technology. Read More »

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Mathematics Group

The Mathematics Group at LBNL develops new mathematical models, devises new algorithms, explores new applications, exports key technologies, and trains young scientists in support of DOE. Read More »

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Scalable Solvers Group

Researchers in the Scalable Solvers Group develop efficient linear and eigensolver algorithms and fast, scalable, library implementations. Read More »